Story Writing For Class 7 8 9 10 11 12 & CBSE

Story Writing For Class 7 8 9 10 11 12 & CBSE

 

What is a short story?

A short as the very name suggests is a story in short. It is actually an imaginative work usually written in prose, often in a narrative format. Since the short story format includes a wide range of genres and styles, the actual length is determined by the individual author’s preference or the story’s actual needs in terms of creative trajectory and the submission guidelines relevant to the story’s actual market. Still, it can be said that the ideal length of a short story spans between one thousand and three thousand words. Short stories originate from oral story-telling traditions and the prose anecdote, a swiftly sketched situation that quickly comes to its point. With the advent of comparatively realistic novel, the short story evolved as a miniature version in the hands of Guy de Maupassant, O. Henry etc, in the nineteenth century. Authors such as Charles Dickens, Virginia Woolf, Rudyard Kipling, William Faulkner, James Joyce, Nathaniel Haw Throne and Ernest Hemmingway were highly accomplished writers of both short stories and novels.

Characteristics of a short story :

Usually a short story is based on one thought or main idea or incident centering round the principal character or protagonist. It has a single plot, a single setting and a small number of characters (usually between one to five). It again covers a short period of time. It has a beginning, a middle and an end. It has a conflict, climax and resolution.

Features of a short story at a glance :

  • Single thought
  • Single plot
  • Single setting
  • Paucity of characters
  •  Short span of time
  •  Protagonist
  •  Conflict
  • Climax
  • Resolution

All short stories, of course, do not follow this pattern. Some short stories (i.e. modern short stories) begin in the middle of the action and very rarely do they have any expositionAs with longer stories, plots of short stories also have a climax, crisis or turning point. The endings of many short stories are, however, abrupt and open. They may or may not have moral or practical lesson. As with any art forms, the exact characteristics of a short story will vary by creator.

 

Types of short stories

When short stories intend to convey a specific ethical or moral perspective, they fall into a more specific subcategory such as fables, folktales, and parables. When short stories are based on some real events they are called anecdotes. Depending on theme short stories may be grouped under several other subcategories such as:

✦ Fables

Parables

◆ Folktales

◆ Fairytales

  • Anecdotes
  • Fantasy stories
  • Science fiction
  • Trickster tales
  • Modern stories
  • Fable:

A Fable is a succinct story in prose or verse that features animals, mythical creatures, plants, inanimate objects or natural elements which are given human qualities and that illustrates a moral lesson, which may at the end be expressed explicitly in a pithy maxim. Aesop who was a Greek slave had to his credit a number of fables which are still popular across the globe.

Anecdote:

It is another ancient form of short story. It was popular under the Roman Empire. It functioned as a sort of parable, a brief realistic narrative that embodies a point. Many surviving/Roman anecdotes were collected in the 13th or 14th century as the Gesta Romanorum.

Parable:

The word parable comes from the Greek ‘parabole’, meaning comparison. It is a short allegorical story with a moral. It is written either in prose or in verse. It differs from a fable in that fables use animals, plants, inanimate objects and natural elements, while parables generally feature human characters. It may be based on real incident or imaginary idea.

A Parable is like a metaphor that has been extended to form a brief, coherent fiction. The best known source of parables in Christianity is the Bible

Some scholars apply the term parable only to the parables of Jesus (such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan), though that is not a common restriction of the term. Some modern short stories can be used as parables. A mid-19th-century parable is the ‘Parable of the Broken Window’, that exposes a fallacy in economic thinking.

John Steinbeck’s The Pearl (1948) is a long prose parable. Wilfred Owen’s poem ‘The Parable of the old Man and the Young’ (1920), which adapts a biblical story to the 1914-18 war is a parable in verse.

Fairytale:

A fairy tale is a simple narrative of folk origin dealing with supernatural beings. Fairy tales may be written or told for the amusement of children or may have a more sophistical narrative containing supernatural or obviously improbable events, scenes and personages and often having a whimsical, satirical, or moralistic character. ‘Cindrella’, ‘Snow white’, ‘Pass in Boots’ are some popular fairy tales.

Folktale:

It is a popular story passed on in oral form from one generation to the other. It is a general term for different varieties of traditional narrative. The forms of folk tales are similar from culture to culture. The term covers almost any traditional narrative, either oral or literary. Its diverse forms include legends and traditions, fairy tales, animal tales, fables, and of course myths.

Techniques of Short Story Writing:

Remember the following points to write a good short story:

1. Write a Catchy First Paragraph.

2. Concentrate on the Protagonist or the Main character.

3. Develop other characters.

4. Choose a Point of view.

5. Write Meaningful Dialogues.

6. Use Setting and Context.

7. Frame a Plot.

8. Create Conflict and Tension.

9. Develop the Plot for Rising Action.

10. Cause a Crisis or Climax

11. Create Falling Action

12. Reach a Resolution.

 

 

1. ROBERT BRUCE & A SPIDER

 

Robert Bruce, a great fighter once became the king of Scotland. He was attacked by the English army several times. He suffered defeat for six times. He had to take shelter in a cave situated in a forest. He lost the hope of regaining his kingdom. He lost the nerve. All on a sudden he caught the sight a spider on the wall. The spider was trying to climb up the wall to reach the roof. Suddenly it fell down. Again it made an assay to climb to the top but fell midway. It tried again and again but failed each time. But it did not give up hope. After six attempts the spider climbed to the roof successfully. Robert Bruce understood that the spider was successful because of his perseverence. Robert Bruce thought of his own case and learnt a lesson. Immediately he mustered up his strength, rallied his forces and waged war against his enemies. This time he became victorious.

 

Moral: Failures are the pillars of success.

 

2. THE FARMER AND HIS IDLE SONS

 

Once upon a time there lived a farmer in a remote village of North 24 Parganas. He had six sons. But they were very lazy and quarrelsome. Very often they quarrelled among themselves over trifling matters. They lived on the small savings of their father. The farmer was old and unhappy. He was worried too about their future. So he made a plan. One day he called all his sons to his bedside. He invited their attention

to the unfurrowed land in front of them. He told them that he had hidden a huge wealth in the fields. He also advised them to dig the soil to get the wealth. The sons rushed to the fields and started digging the land. They ploughed the land thoroughly but did not get any wealth. Then according to a neighbour’s advice they sowed seeds of paddy. That year they got a bumper crop. They understood their father’s words and lived happily ever after.

 

3. NAPOLEON AND THE BRITISH SAILOR

 

Once Napoleon was rallying his forces to invade England. At that time his navy arrested a British sailor. The seaman, of course, had the permission to walk about on the shore opposite the English coast. One day an empty barrel came floating to him. The man hid it in a cave. After a day’s strenuous work he made it into a miserable boat to cross over to England. But as soon as he made an attempt to sail, he was detected and brought before Napoleon. The emperor asked why he wanted to risk his life in such a boat. The sailor replied boldly that it was the thought of his mother that prompted him to bet his life in such a boat. The emperor was moved to know the depth of his affection for his mother. He patted him on the head and offered him a piece of gold as a present. He also sent him back to England in a French ship with a flag of truce. The sailor preserved the gift through all his troubles life.

4. THE VAIN CROW

Once a crow took its perch on the branch of a tree with a piece of flesh in her beak. A fox saw her and longed to have the flesh.

He said aloud, ‘How beautiful the crow is! How glossy her feathers! But alas! God has given her no voice. It is really very cruel of Him’. Flattered by the fox, the crow opened her mouth to give a loud caw. She wanted to prove that she had a voice. The flesh dropped from her beak. The fox picked it up and went away saying, ‘Vain bird, had you been half as wise as you are vain, you would not have lost the flesh’.

Moral: Vanity leads to misfortune.

 

5. THE FOX AND THE GOAT

 

Once a fox fell into a well and was unable to get out again. Being thirsty, a goat came near the well and saw the fox inside. The goat said, ‘How is the water?’ ‘Good’, said the fox, ‘its’ the best water I ever tasted in all my life. Come down and try it yourself.’ The goat was so eager to quench his thirst that without thinking for the second time he jumped in at once. When he had had enough to drink, he looked about, like the fox, for some way of getting out, but could find none. The fox said forthwith, ‘I have an idea. You stand on your hind legs, and plant your forelegs firmly against the side of the well, and then I’ll climb on to your back, and from there, by stepping on your horns, I can get out and, when I’m out, I’ll help you out too. Again without thinking deeply the goat agreed to his proposal. The fox climbed on to his back and came out of the well. Then the fox coolly walked away. The goat called loudly after him, reminding him of his promise to help him out. But the fox merely turned and said, ‘If you had as much sense in your head as you have hair in your beard you wouldn’t have got into the well without being sure that you could get out again.’

Moral: Look before you leap.

 

6. THE ANT AND THE GRASS-HOPPER

 

Once on a frosty autumn day an ant was busy storing away some wheat he had procured during the summer. He gathered wheat for use in winter.

A famished grass-hopper suddenly came limping by. He understood why the ant was working so hard. He asked for a morsel from the ant’s store to save his life. Why did you idle away time during the whole summer?’, asked the ant, ‘Oh’ replied the

grass-hopper, ‘I was not idle. I was singing and chirping all day long. Well, said the ant, smiling grimly as he locked the store, since you sang all summer, it seems as though you would have to dance all winter.

 

7. A GOLDEN GOOSE

 

Once a poor farmer got a strange goose. The goose used to lay a golden egg everyday. The man became gradually rich by selling the eggs. He erected a good building and bought many beautiful furniture to live comfortably.

But with the passage of time the man became greedy. He did not feel satisfied with one golden egg daily. To amass a huge fortune overnight he wanted to get all the golden eggs at a time. With this end in view he killed the goose one day. But he did not find a single golden egg in his belly. Thus the farmer lost both the goose and the chance of getting at least one golden egg daily.

Moral: Much greediness results in more loss.

 

 

8. THE TRADER AND HIS DONKEY

Once a trader was going to the market with his donkey. The donkey was carrying a load of salt on its back. While crossing the bridge of a pool, the donkey suddenly fell into the pool. The water dissolved a good amount of salt. As a result, the load became lighter and the donkey felt happy.

Nextday the trader was going to the market along the same path. The donkey was carrying the same load of salt on its back, while crossing the same bridge, the donkey intentionally fell into the pool to make the load lighter. The trader understood the donkey’s trick. On the third day the trader put a load of cotton on his donkey’s back and was crossing the same bridge. The donkey applied the trick and fell into the pool. This time the load became much heavier than before as the cotton was soaked in water. Thus the donkey got a good lesson.

Moral : Trickery is not always beneficial.

 

 

9. LORD BUDDHA AND A BEREAVED MOTHER

 

Once a poor woman came to Lord Buddha begging his dead son’s life. She wanted to know if he could suggest a medicine that could revive her dead son’s life, Lord Buddha told her calmly that there was only one medicine that could restore life to her son’s dead body. He requested her to bring a handful of mustard seeds from a house where death had never entered. The bereaved mother wandered from door to door to get such mustard seeds. But she found no such house.

One woman said, ‘I have lost my husband.’

Another said, ‘Our youngest child died of cholera last year.’

One man said, ‘My wife died last month.’

She returned to Buddha with a heavy heart and told Buddha that she did not find any house where death did not pay a visit.

Then Buddha said with words of consolation; “Everyone on this earth is sure to die. We all will die one day; Death is inevitable to all.’

Then he told her that she should not ponder over her own grief so much, as sorrow and death are common to all.

Moral: Sorrow and death are common to all.

 

 

10. THE WOLF AND THE DOG

Once a wolf chanced to come upon a bonny dog. The wolf did not chase him. He rather greeted the dog and wanted to be his friend. Soon they became friends. They started telling to each other about their own ways of living. Proud of his own comforts at home, the dog began to praise his master and his master’s love for him. The dog also spoke of the special food he enjoyed. His duty was to keep watch at night. Thus his work was light and he felt very comfortable there. The wolf on the other hand had to live miserably in the forest. He sometimes had to go without food the whole day. The dog pitied his fate with an air of superiority. All on a sudden the wolf noticed a mark on the dog’s neck and asked him what it was. The dog replied that it was the mark of the chain. Now it was the wolf’s turn to be proud of his position as he enjoyed perfect freedom and no chain could bind him. The wolf did not envy the dog any more.

The wolf said, ‘So you are not free after all’. He also said, ‘I don’t envy you. Rather I pity you for your plight, for freedom is always better than comfort and good food’. Then the wolf bid him good bye and went away.

Moral: Poverty and freedom is better than wealth and chains.

 

 

11. THE FARMER AND HIS SONS

There lived an old farmer in a remote village. He had four sons. But they were very quarrelsome. Very often they fell out over trifles and stopped talking to each other. As the farmer was aging he felt worried about the fate of his sons. He wanted them to live unitedly and peacefully. With a view to teaching them the strength of unity he made a plan. He brought some sticks and called his sons to his bedside. Then he gave one stick to each of his sons and asked them to break them. They immediately took the sticks and broke them easily. Then the farmer asked his sons to make a bundle of the sticks and asked each of his sons to break the bundle. They all tried to break the bundle in turn. They tried hard to break it but failed. Then the farmer said to them affectionately, ‘Dear sons, united we stand, divided we fall. With these words the farmer breathed his last. The farmer’s sons understood their father’s lesson very well and stopped quarrelling. Since then he lived peacefully ever after.

12. A THIRSTY CROW

Once a thirsty crow tried in vain to find some water to drink. He flew from place to place. All on a sudden he came across a pitcher. It contained a little water at the bottom. The crow was thinking very hard as to how to get the water. Then he made a plan. He brought some pieces of stone from a nearby place and dropped them into the pitcher one by one. Soon the water level rose up and the crow drank water to his heart’s fill.

 

13. AN ENDANGERED FROG AND HIS COMPANIONS

Once a group of frogs who lived in a big pond started travelling through the nearby woods. All on a sudden one of them fell into a deep pit. When the other frogs looked into the pit, they were terrified. They told the frog that he was as good as dead. But the frog ignored their words and tried desperately to jump out of the pit. The other frogs prohibited him to jump as they declared that he would not be able to come out alive. But the frog did not give up. He tried to jump out even harder and finally made it out. When he got out the other frogs said, ‘Did you not hear us?’ The frog explained to them that he was deaf. He thought they were encouraging him all the time.

Moral: There is power of life and death in the tongue. An encouraging word to one who is down can lift him up.

 

 

14. TWO NEIGHBOURS

A big tree stood at the edge of a village. Its boughs spread out majestically and so did its roots. It protected people from the sun under its shady leaves, and provided shelter to numberless birds and other small creatures in its branches.

At the foot of the tree grew a little plant. The plant was willowy and delicate. One day, the two neighbours were having a little chat. “Well, little one,” said the big tree to the plant, “Why do you not plant your feet deeply in the ground, and raise your head boldly in the air as I do?”

“I see no need to do so,” said the plant, quietly with a smile. “Actually, I think I may be safer this way.”

“Safer!” sneered the tree. “Are you suggesting that you’re safer than I am? Do you know how deep my roots are buried, how thick and strong my trunk is? Even if two men hold hands they would not be able to surround my trunk. Who could possibly pluck me by the roots or bow my head to the ground?”

And the tree turned away from the plant in a great huff.

The little plant kept mum. One evening a terrible whirlwind arose in the region. It hurled the trees off their roots and almost completely destroyed the forest. After the storm was over, the villagers surveyed the damage. Big and tall trees that had once almost touched the sky were now razed to the ground.

But there was one exception. The little plant had been tossed and turned under the fury of the wind, and bent completely. But when it sighed and stood upright again. There was, of course, no trace of its mighty neighbour.

Moral: One should not boast of one’s might.

 

15. A FARMER AND HIS PUPPIES

Once a farmer needed to sell some of his puppies. As he was walking along a path, he felt a tug on his overalls. He looked down into the eyes of a little boy. “Mister,” he said, “I want to buy one of your puppies.”

“Well,” said the farmer, as he rubbed the sweat off the back of his neck, “these puppies come from fine parents and cost a good deal of money.”

The boy dropped his head for a moment. Then reaching deep into his pocket, he pulled out a handful of change and held it up to the farmer. “I’ve got thirty-nine cents. Is that enough to take a look?”

“Sure,” said the farmer.

And with that he let out a whistle, “Here, Dolly!” he called.

Out from the doghouse and down the ramp ran Dolly followed by four little balls of fur. The little boy pressed his face against the chain link fence. His eyes danced with delight. As the dogs made their way to the fence, the little boy noticed something else stirring inside the doghouse. Slowly another little ball appeared. This one noticeably smaller. Down

the ramp it slid. Then in a somewhat awkward manner the little pup began hobbling toward the others, doing its best to catch up……

little boy said, pointing to the runt. The farmer knelt down at the boy’s side and said, “Son, you don’t want that puppy. He will never be able to run and play with you like these other dogs would.” With that the little boy stepped back from the fence, reached down, and began rolling up one leg of his trousers. In doing so he revealed a steel brace running down both sides of his leg attaching itself to a specially made shoe. Looking back up at the farmer, he said, “You see sir, I don’t run too well myself, and he will need someone who understands.”

“I want that one,” the

→ Moral: The world is full of people who need someone who understands.

 

 

16. TWO CATS AND A MONKEY

There lived two cats in a big house. But the household was a miser and cruel to pets. He saw that the left-overs of the members of the family were very limited. Once the two cats helped each other to steal a piece of bread. They both joined hands in taking it out to a shady place under a big tree.

I’ll now eat the bread’, said the white cat, but I’ll give you a small piece because you helped me’.

Don’t try to be too smart,’ said the black cat. ‘The loaf is mine and I will eat it. I’ll give you a small piece, though’.

When the white cat was about to run away with the loaf, the black cat pounced upon it. Soon they were locked up in a fight. They were clawing and biting each other. A monkey sitting on the branch of a nearby tree watched the fight. It came down and sat beside the bread.

‘Why are you fighting, you stupid cats?’ asked the monkey.

The white cat said, ‘That loaf is mine because I stole it’.

‘That loaf is mine,’ said the black cat, ‘I stole it’.

‘Then you have to divide the bread into two halves and each one can have half a loaf’, said the monkey, ‘Come along and I’ll divide the loaf for you.’ The cats agreed. They sat on either side of the monkey. The monkey broke the loaf. The white cat said,

‘The piece in your right hand has become bigger.’

‘I must make them equal in size’, said the monkey and it bit off a mouthful from the piece in his right hand.’

‘Now look!’ exclaimed the black cat, ‘the piece in your left hand has become bigger’. ‘You’re right’, said the monkey, and it bit off a second mouthful from the piece in its left hand.

‘Now look!’ exclaimed the white cat, ‘the piece in your right hand has become bigger. ‘You’re absolutely right,’ said the monkey looking carefully at the pieces of bread in its

hands. It bit off a third mouthful from the piece in the right hand.

In the next few minutes the monkey’s method of dividing the loaf equally ended in the monkey eating the entire loaf.

As soon as the two foolish cats, understood that there was no bread left for them, the monkey jumped up a branch and disappeared among the leaves of the tree. The hungry cats became angry but understanding their foolishness they walked away in the opposite directions.

12. THE STAG AT THE POOL

Astag, one summer day, came to a pool of clear, still water to quench his thirst As he drank he noticed his reflection in the pool and could not help admiring the image he saw there “I really am very handsome,” said he to himself. “I should be proud of those beautiful, stately antlers. But those spindling legs and tiny feet are another matter. I wish that nature might have been more kind to me and had given me legs more worthy to bear such a noble crown.”

Just at that moment the stag’s sensitive nostrils scented the approach of a hunter, and even as he lingered an arrow whizzed past him. With a bound he was away, and the legs and teet of which he had just been so critical carried him speedily to a place of safety. But once out of harm’s way the stag again fell to musing over his appearance, and before he knew it he had wandered into a thicket. The noble antlers which he had so greatly ad. mired now held him fast, and the more he struggled the more firmly entangled he became Then the hunters came, and as the arrow found its mark, he gasped: “Now that it is too late I realize that my own vanity led to my undoing.”

– Moral: Too often we despise the very things that are most useful to us.

 

 

18. THE WOLF AND THE LAMB

As a wolf was lapping at the head of a running brook he spied a lamb daintily paddling his feet some distance down the stream,

“There’s my supper,” thought the wolf. “But I’ll have to find some excuse for attacking such a harmless creature.”

So he shouted down at the lamb, “How dare you stir up the water I am drinking and make it muddy?”

“But you must be mistaken, “bleated the lamb. “How can I be spoiling your water, since it runs from you to me and not from me to you?”

“Don’t argue,” snapped the wolf. “I know you. You are the one who was saying those ugly things about me behind my back a year ago.” “Oh, sir,”

replied the lamb, trembling, “a year ago I was not even born.” “Well,” snarled the wolf, “if it was not you, then it was your father, and that amounts to the same thing. Besides, I’m not going to have you argue me out of my supper.” Without another word he fell upon the helpless lamb and tore her to pieces.

– Moral: Any excuse will serve a tyrant.

 

 

19. THE BULL AND THE GOAT

 

A bull, pursued by a lion, took shelter in a cave which was the home of a wild goat. Greatly annoyed with the intruder, the goat began to butt the tired bull with his horns. He bore the ill-treatment of the goat with patience, saying: “Because I permit you to vent your displeasure on me now does not mean that I am afraid of you. As soon as the lion is out of sight and the danger is past, then I will show you the difference between a lion and a goat.”

Moral: Those who take temporary advantage of their neighbours’ difficulties may live to repent their insolence.

 

20. THE WIND AND THE SUN

A dispute once arose between the wind and the sun over who was the stronger of the two. There seemed to be no way of settling the issue. But suddenly they saw a traveller coming down the road.

“This is our chance,” said the sun, “to prove who is right. Whichever of us can make that man take off his coat shall be the stronger. And just to show you how sure I am, I’ll let you have the first chance.”

So the sun hid behind a cloud, and the wind blew an icy blast. But the harder he blew the more closely did the traveller wrap his coat around him. At last the wind had to give up in disgust. Then the sun came out from behind the cloud and began to shine down upon the traveller with all his power. The traveller felt the sun’s genial warmth, and as he grew warmer and warmer he began to loosen his coat. Finally he was forced to take it off altogether and to sit down in the shade of a tree and fan himself. So the sun was right, after all!

Moral: Persuasion is better than force.

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